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Fish Breeding and size of growth

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  • Fish Breeding and size of growth

    Hi Guys,

    As an ongoing theme from my "Fish Prices and where to buy" thread - I wanted to know if anyone can advise on the following

    Lets say I have dug my water and allowed it to mature and at the same time dug breeding ponds .... now ready to introduce fish bought from the fish farm.

    So from what size do carp breed? And how quickly do they increase in size - basically I'm looking at a 3 year plan, i.e. not opening the water for 3 years from the point of stocking it so I'm trying to get the right amount of fish and also breed them to aid the stocking.

    Also what to know what mix of fish to introduce.
    Simon Young
    Admin
    Talk Angling UK fishing chat and tackle
    web design Doncaster - Limitless Digital

  • #2
    Simon,
    There is no definitive size at which carp mature. Notwithstanding the new fast growing F1 and F2 strains, the norm for the Uk will be that carp become mature at around 3 to 4 years. However, the principal factor determining this is water temperature and, to a lesser degree, light. In warmer climates smaller sized carp can become mature from around 1 year.

    Furthermore, once they are mature they require water temperature to exceed 18c for a few days to trigger the hormones. Successful breeding therefore also requires a few other considerations, such as location and size of the breed pool and water flow - try to avoid it being spring fed as it lowers the temperature. Many breeders enhance their success rates by using heated tanks at around 22 to 24C and giving the females a hormone injection before hand stripping them off their eggs.

    If you really are thinking of going down this route speak to Sparsholt. They have some great books on the subject and £20 or so is nowt to pay for advice that could save you thousands.

    Cheers,
    Stu

    PS I look forward to receiving my free season ticket!!!
    A Southerner, lost in the Midlands. ;)

    Comment


    • #3
      Simon,
      As for growth rates this will largely depend on water quality and temperature (optimum is 20 to 30c), stocking density and food quality. However as a rule of thumb normal growth rates are C1 fish (one summer of growth) up to 1/2oz, C2 fish (2 summers) 1/2lb to 3/4lb and C3 fish 2lb to 5lb. Faster growth rates are achievable with perfect/artificial conditions but these are the norm.

      There will obviously be casualties on the way especially with the fingerlings in year 1. After that 10 to 20% loss is around the norm.

      Given that you will need multiple pools for growing on the different year classes and a stack of time, unless you simply allow nature to take its course with mature fish, you may want to seriously think whether the cost of breeding and growing on is worthwhile.

      I would suggest your best option is to avoid the breeeding route and have one stock pond and buy C2 fish and let them grow on for a year before transferring them into your fishery ponds. C2 fish will be cheaper than fishery ready C3+ fish, will be ready for transfer in one year, yet will not have the capital costs of requiring multiple breeding and stock ponds.

      Cheers,
      Stu
      A Southerner, lost in the Midlands. ;)

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the advice Stu... will definately owe a few people season tickets!
        Simon Young
        Admin
        Talk Angling UK fishing chat and tackle
        web design Doncaster - Limitless Digital

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