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Are newer methods of fishing unnecessarily over complicated?

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  • Are newer methods of fishing unnecessarily over complicated?

    I just wondered what your opinions were on newer methods of fishing vs more traditional methods and whether advances have actually altered anything. I ask the question as I am very new to fishing and go with my Dad who has been fishing for over 50 years. Being new to it I have bought all manner of magazines/books and done endless research to attempt to get the most success out of fishing. However, my Dad keeps everything very simple. Generally he only float fishes with a straight forward hook and tends to use only maggots or sweetcorn as bait. I however have been experimenting with such things as hair rigs, lassoo's, using pellets/boilies etc. Dad has a very sceptical opinion on this.

    Up until now I have dismissed this as an unwillingness to adapt to new methods. However, the fact is that he has far more success doing it the 'old fasioned' way than myself and from what I can tell, anyone else around us wherever we go. A visit to Packington Somers last weekend really highlighted this. I was personally pleased catching 5 lovely fish, a mix of Tench & Carp, and had an extremely enjoyable day. Dad, sat at the adjacent peg, also enjoyed his day with close to 30 fish in the same time! A large part of this is undoubtedly down to his years of experience and my lack of it but I do begin to question whether he does in fact have a point. He will catch every variety of fish from gudgeon & roach to impressive sized carp, simply float fishing with a straight forward hook and maggots. What are your thoughts? Is the fishing, and the numerous complicated rigs and baits, which I read of in the likes of 'Improve You Coarse Fishing,' 'Total Coarse Fishing' and other publications over complicating things with very little difference in success rate?

  • #2
    I reckon i could write a book as a reply to this one mate,but the way i see it ,its venues that have changed most,but in general,my approach is much like your dads KISS,advances in tackle and baits need to be embraced but they dont make a good angler,most of the modern methods will work on most commies,but try them on ordinary waters and they fail,most of them are thought out around smallish waters with heavy stocking densities,its horses for courses and on the day certain methods and tactics will always come to the fore,but Im with your dad on this one,but he is obviously a good angler if he now takes advantage of new tecchnology you will never beat him.
    Take nothing but photographs,leave nothing but footprints.

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    • #3
      its all a case of practice try the method feeder for a commercial always seems to be a good alrounder.

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      • #4
        I always say keep it simple, there's no reason why old styles aren't as relative today as they were when your dad started. A classic example can be found in fly fishing - new flies are being designed all the time, yet many old style flies are far more representative of the food a trout will be eating naturally. That said, modern flies stimulate the natural predatory aggressiveness of the trout more than some older patterns that merely mimic small insect life. That said, they'll all work on certain days. What could be more sensitive and resistence free than a freelined bait - just a hook on the end of the line with bait on and watch the line for movement? Start adding leads, feeders, stand'off rigs etc, and you increase resistence.

        Modern rigs are designed for various reasons, but general, non-specimen-hunting rigs are used as the angler believes they will catch more fish, more quickly in a contest. I have said berfore, that a book by the great John Wilson - 'Go Fishing Techniques' re-inspired me to go fishing when I was ready to give it up. The book highlights simple, basic methods and how to use them properly... and all the methods work.
        [I][url]www.aquonix.co.uk[/url]

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        • #5
          Although some really useful tackle has come onto the market over the years,
          a lot of it has always been designed to improve the chances of hooking anglers wallets not fish.

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          • #6
            Hi all. Thanks for your replies on this one. It’s very interesting and I think I will attempt to resist the temptation to complicate things. It seems the simple approach is the way to go, certainly at this early learning stage. I must admit to being a little confused by hair rigs. I see their use in that this is how boilies and hard pellets are fished, but struggle to see the advantage in hair rigging other baits such as sweetcorn or lassoing maggots as some suggest. Do you not stand a better chance if these are directly on the hook rather than a few inches away?!

            It does seem it would be very easy to spend a lot of money on things that really do promise a lot but in all likelihood make little or no difference. Fish Farmer, I have taken your advice and just bought myself a second hand copy of ‘Go Fishing Techniques’ on eBay which looks like it could be a very well spent £1.99. Cheers.

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            • #7
              Barny,88 before he passed away this year,never used anything complicated nearly always caught a few fish.
              Take nothing but photographs,leave nothing but footprints.

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              • #8
                Fantastically inspiring! Cheers Hurricane

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by wish4fish View Post
                  Although some really useful tackle has come onto the market over the years,
                  a lot of it has always been designed to improve the chances of hooking anglers wallets not fish.
                  A very cynical view, with which I fully concur.....

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Richard75 View Post
                    Hi all. Thanks for your replies on this one. It’s very interesting and I think I will attempt to resist the temptation to complicate things. It seems the simple approach is the way to go, certainly at this early learning stage. I must admit to being a little confused by hair rigs. I see their use in that this is how boilies and hard pellets are fished, but struggle to see the advantage in hair rigging other baits such as sweetcorn or lassoing maggots as some suggest. Do you not stand a better chance if these are directly on the hook rather than a few inches away?!

                    It does seem it would be very easy to spend a lot of money on things that really do promise a lot but in all likelihood make little or no difference. Fish Farmer, I have taken your advice and just bought myself a second hand copy of ‘Go Fishing Techniques’ on eBay which looks like it could be a very well spent £1.99. Cheers.
                    Good man - what a bargain... Ithink wilson owes me some commission!
                    [I][url]www.aquonix.co.uk[/url]

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                    • #11
                      its very easy to get caught up in this supposed progress. at the end of the day, all the tackle manufacturers and sale outlets are there to make money. nothing wrong with that but i doubt most of the newer wonder baits or tackle have any real provable merit.

                      but dont blinker everything new out of your days on the bank. im pretty much old school myself. but sitting on my local canal last weekend, a place ive known for years, i sat as usual armed with caster and hemp and decided to try something different while i had a cuppa in the hope that the new bait would be left alone long enough for me to drink it. how wrong could i be? the caster has served me very well over the years on my local canal producing good quality roach, the occasional chub and the odd rare tench. but a certain flavour pellet which i picked up fom a car boot sale saw everything i caught for the rest of the day increase in size and the bite frequency doubled. i had 5 different flavoured pellets with me but only one was found interesting.

                      ive only started trying pellet this year after 30 odd years on the bank.
                      makes me want to try something else new
                      north nott's member and serial buyer of stuff i dont need :D

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