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centrepin reel

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  • centrepin reel

    im going to buy a centrepin reel for some waggler fishing soon, ive never used one before, how much line do they hold and are they easy to cast with

  • #2
    Depends on the size of the drum but 50 yds is ample.
    Casting is often done by pulling 3 or 4 loops of line from between the rod rings and casting from the side or underarm,the other main method is to flick the free spool with your thumb as the float is cast but this takes good timing and a fair bit of practice.
    Maggotdrowner is selling a Marco cortesi mk2 in as new condition if you are interested.
    Take nothing but photographs,leave nothing but footprints.

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    • #3
      do they cast a far distance and can you cast an overhead cast

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      • #4
        always thought that pins where designed for stick float fishing not for casting wagglers

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        • #5
          Originally posted by hawb81 View Post
          do they cast a far distance and can you cast an overhead cast
          No and no unless you buy one where the drum rotates through a 90 degree angle for casting.
          Take nothing but photographs,leave nothing but footprints.

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          • #6
            not recommended for waggler fishing origionally designed for stick float or close to bank fishing you would be better off with fixed spool reel if you want to cast distances

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            • #7
              what are the benefits of a centerpin reel

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              • #8
                you can get a centrepin with side cast shakespeare do one the 100year one. big mistake people make with a centre pin is putting to much line on 80 to 100 yards max also a lot like a rod with a full cork handle rod,lovely for fishing on rivers and on still waters brill for roach fishing and carp

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                • #9
                  You can use whatever float you like with a pin but you are limited to fishing to within a few rodlengths distance. Practice will gain extra yards and i can comfortably cast mine to around 4 rodlengths. The main advantage of useing the pin is that it gives line direct from the spool, having no gears, so it is a far more pleasureable experience to play fish on, and more unlikely to get broken if the fish surges off. Before modern fixed spool reels were invented, it's all anglers had to use, and if you can afford a good one, it will last a lifetime if looked after. PS i wouldn't reccomend the side casting versions as when you cast line comes off the spool sideways, and when you reel in the line comes back on straight. simple you might think, but trust me, this causes horrendous line twist as i found out to my dismay after spending £320 on a pin with this facility. after half hours trotting all i had was pigtails everywhere and the line was ruined.
                  Last edited by maggotdrowner; 7 May 2012, 12:14 PM. Reason: addd ons

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                  • #10
                    i was going to use this reel to fish past a bed of lillies which are about 12 metres from the bank, what is the best way to cast

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                    • #11
                      If you intend to fish that far out you are better off sticking to a fixed spool reel. A distance of 12m is achievable but you would need to be an experienced caster with a favourable wind which never happens on the days that you intend to fish.

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                      • #12
                        as has been suggested the marco is a great first pin. i got mine last summer and have had some real fun fishing the margins and lilly beds for the carp. my heart was in my mouth every time i hooked a fish, absoloutly brilliant fun and now im hooked. there ideal for delicate rigs at close range but havent managed to get mine down the river for a bit of trotting yet but i will be this year. one thing to remember when buying a pin is its not how long it spins for its about how much weight it takes for the drum to star turning.

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                        • #13
                          maybe its not what i was hoping for and i might be better off with a fixed spool reel

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hawb81 View Post
                            maybe its not what i was hoping for and i might be better off with a fixed spool reel
                            Go with that thought. Having got myself brainwashed by the misty eyed romanticism for centrepins that can be seen on so many forums, I gave it a go. Good luck to those that love them, but I can see no advantage whatsoever in using a centrepin over a fixed spool reel for anything other than trotting a stick float.

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                            • #15
                              Trotting aside, a Centrepin is great for drag control. Better IMO than a fixed spool, as you can adjust by feel. I always found fixed spool drags a bit snatchy.

                              Pin type reels are great fun for margin fishing, but you have to do a bit more to reap the benefits.
                              [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

                              Half man, half Octoplus, half bean wannabe test pilot.

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