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Test Curve

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  • Test Curve

    I've been having a luck a some rods on the internet and on quite a few descriptions they quote Test Curve.
    Can anyone explain what this is?

  • #2
    The test curve of a rod is measured by the amount of weight required to bend the rod tip 90 degrees from the horizontal.

    www.polefloatsbyjasonelwell.co.uk

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    • #3
      So the larger the weight it takes to bend the rod the stronger and therefore the bigger the fish it can handle.

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      • #4
        Correct, the average match rod will be less than a pound, an avon type rod will be around 1 1/4, barbel rods 1 1/2, and carp rod generally start at 2lb.
        Whilst most match type rods are not rated by test curve some do have reel line and hook line strengths applied to them again the heavier the line the stronger the rod.
        Last edited by Brian G; 13 May 2007, 11:50 PM.

        www.polefloatsbyjasonelwell.co.uk

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        • #5
          I visited a water near me that I fancy having a go at. The guy in the on site shop showed me a rod that had a Test curve of 3.5lb. He also recommended that I put a 15lb main line as the main lake had Carp to 40lb.

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          • #6
            Would have thought that 3 1/2 lb was a bit over gunned for a forty and a 3lb would better, but if you wanted to do some spodding then a 3 1/2 would cover it, 15lb line also seems a bit light but then I am no big carp expert.

            www.polefloatsbyjasonelwell.co.uk

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            • #7
              Would you fish the 15lb through to the hook or would you have a lesser hooklength.

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              • #8
                you can bet that they will have a stronger hook length / leader, the lighter the reel line the better the distance you will cast, as i say I am not a big carp man but that seems to be the way they do it, again a lot will depend on the weight of lead you are trying to cast as to the set up, catching big carp is almost another world to us pole anglers and a forty is the fish of a life time.

                www.polefloatsbyjasonelwell.co.uk

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the advice.
                  As you are a Pole man you might be able to answer the other question I have asked.
                  Is there a list anywhere that shows which pole floats to use in which conditions and for which fish?

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                  • #10
                    the answer to the pole floats question is no there is not really a list although some manufacturers do catalogue their floats under headings like lake, rivers, canals, but the crossover between them is common, hook baits often determine the choice of float it needs different tips for bloodworm, pellet, and sweetcorn, the type of species does not really come into play with maybe the exception of carp where a tough float is required especially in snaggy situations.

                    www.polefloatsbyjasonelwell.co.uk

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                    • #11
                      So what should I be looking at.

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